Advancements in medical science continue to amaze me. The creative ideas behind this team of scientists is astounding. By utilizing the MRI to measure the heat sign of the tumor they are essentially reading volume destruction in real time. It's quite brilliant actually. I love science!
Chen and his team used a technique called laser interstitial thermal therapy. The procedure is performed inside an MRI machine while the patient is under general anesthesia. A dime-size hole is created in the patient's skull to access the tumor. A laser probe is then inserted into the tumor under real-time MRI monitoring and computer guidance. When the tumor is reached, the laser beam is activated, heating and destroying .

Neurosurgeon Clark Chen, MD, PhD, treats recurrent brain cancer with MRI-guided laser technology at UC San Diego Health System.
"It is well-known that MRI can be used to generate detailed images of the brain. What is less known is that MRI can also be used to measure the internal temperature of the brain," said Chen. "With this application, I can view the tumor in real time as it is being destroyed while customizing the effects of the laser to the tumor without injuries to the surrounding normal brain. This incredible visualization allows neurosurgeons to preserve billions of neuronal connections that are essential for normal brain function."
Many types of  can be treated using this , according to Chen, including glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas and brain metastases.......
Patients undergoing thermal ablation are typically discharged from hospital one day after the procedure and can return to normal activities. The laser ablation requires real-time MRI monitoring and a dedicated intra-operative MRI team. The procedure cannot be performed in a conventional operating room.
The NeuroBlate System was developed by Monteris Medical, Inc., Plymouth, MN. The NeuroBlate System is also used to treat epileptic disorders and chronic inflammation caused by ionizing radiation.
Read more here: http://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2014-02-doctors-deep-brain-tumor-mri-guided.
Provided by University of California - San Diego