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Thursday, May 28, 2009

Iphone and MRI its here ! as seen on television


 

AMAZON search for Iphone

GOOGLE search for iphones
  

OsiriX , the wonderful open-source Mac image viewer, just announced the availability of an iPhone version.

Like a lot of imaging software, OsiriX lets one look at X-rays, ultrasounds, CT and MR images. Besides merely viewing, it also lets one reconstruct 3D images and rotate them around.

Unlike most imaging software, OsiriX is written by radiologists who also happen to be clever programmers. Also unlike most imaging software, OsiriX doesn’t require a second mortgage. The full Mac-based version is free, and the iPhone app is $20.

Why should a non-physician care about Osirix? Because this little app will let you carry around a library of your own personal medical images. Even in my prior life as an internist, I always urged patients to keep their own copy of their more important images. The OsiriX app finally makes this easy and portable. 

In the radiology biz, we call prior imaging exams “old films”, and they can be staggeringly useful to a patient and their physicians. One of my patients once avoided having a risky lung biopsy simply because he happened to have an old film at home as a curiosity. This old film showed us pretty convincingly that the potential lung cancer we saw on his new film was actually a benign granuloma, and was unchanged over the intervening decades.

How do you get copies of your own images? Ask your local radiology department to burn you a CD in DICOM format. Most departments will also include free image-viewing software on the disk. If you’re a Mac owner, download a copy of OsiriX, which will read virtually all of these disks, even if written by PC’s.

If you’re a geeky radiologist, you’re probably already playing with the new app. If you’re a non-geek, ask your teenager or local radiologist to put it on your phone for you.(source)




Philips Panorama High Field Open


Comfortable, high field open MRI

Our Panorama high field Open MRI appeals to both patients and referring physicians alike with it’s wide-open design, high image quality, large field of view and broad coverage of clinical applications. Thanks to it’s unique features, the Panorama HFO provides the potential for you to attract more patients and increase your referral area.

 

The Panorama HFO provides a 360-degree panoramic viewing angle and spacious 160 cm-wide patient aperture ensuring a comfortable, relaxing MRI experience for anxious, elderly, obese or claustrophobic patients.

 

While covering all routine applications, it is especially ideal for orthopedic, pediatric and bariatric imaging. The wide-open patient space allows you to explore new clinical applications such as biopsy procedures and kinematic joint studies.

 

High Field Performance comparable to 1.5T in a truly open configuration

  • Solenoid Technology coils
    • Superb coverage and comfort
    • High SNR
    • Fully SENSE compatible
    • Excellent homogeneity
  • 1.5T signal, 1.0T contrast for minimal susceptibility and distortion
  • SmartExam – One click to consistent and reproducible MRI exams
    • One click for planning, scanning and processing
    • 100% consistency and reproducibility
    • Covers over 75% of examinations
    • Brain, Knee, Shoulder and Spine capabilities
  • ExamCards automate the most complex studies
  • Clinical performance in all applications

 

Preferred by Patients

  • 72% of patients prefer the Panorama over any cylindrical system*
  • Ambient Experience further boosts preference
  • Preference represents value
  • Ability to market your practice directly to the patient
  • Source: GfK Panelservices Benelux

 

 

Going Beyond the Bore 

  • Area of interest can always be placed at iso-center
    • Uncompromised fat-sat
    • Fewer motion artifacts
  • Virtually any patient, any position
    • No coils necessary for the most challenging patients
    • Sideways scanning is no issue
  • Open line of sight – always
    • Reduced need for sedation
    • Visual contact w/loved ones always intact
  • Unlimited accessibility
    • Real-time scanning & viewing
    • Patient can remain in scanner
      • Reduced need for repositioning
      • Fast, accurate scanning

Hitachi Oasis 1.2 Tesla open MRI

I have worked on the Aries II this looks like a high field version of that scanner if anyone has Experience with this scanner please post a comment. Good or bad. Thanks


http://www.oasismri.com/

    

OASIS™  featured on National Medical Report

 

OASIS™ provides maximum diagnostic performance and uncompromised patient comfort. Combining high-performance MR electronics of the best high-field equipment — fast gradients and multi-channel RF technology with Hitachi-designed Zenith RF coils — with Hitachi’s proprietary 1.2T open architecture vertical-field magnet, Oasis is a new generation of MR systems providing diagnostic confidence, patient comfort and investment value.

Oasis supports demanding workflow, features Hitachi’s legendary reliability, is easy to learn and use, and provides powerful differentiating features for you MR imaging services.

 

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

join coolmristuff's facebook group

Click this lick below to join one of the fastest growing MRI groups on Facebook.

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=9583543297

BrainLab AG is releasing Digital Lightbox A giant Iphone for the OR










BrainLab AG is planning on releasing an updated version of its Digital Lightbox multitouch clinical display. Still reminding us of a giant iPhone, the unit interfaces with EMRs to display and manipulate clinical images easily and intuitively, essentially making the keyboard or any other interface device unnecessary.





High field Extremity MRI



High Field (1.0 T) Extremity MRI

The dedicated extremity MR scanner at Mass General Imaging West, Waltham, is designed for

scanning the hand, wrist, elbow, foot, ankle, and knee

The diagnostic quality is comparable to 1.5 T conventional whole-body MR scanners

The maximum field of view of the extremity MR is 16 cm, which limits visualization of

longitudinal structures such as the quadriceps muscle and Achilles tendon

The bore size (18 cm) is too small for some applications (e.g. large knees) and is not suitable for

patients with leg or ankle casts or patients with limited flexibility

The 1.0 T MR dedicated extremity scanner (Figure 1),

installed at Mass General West Imaging, Waltham, is

designed to image the bones, joints, and soft tissues of

the hand, wrist (Figure 2), elbow, foot, ankle, and

knee. Because the joint of interest is centered in the

extremity scanner, it is always at the “sweet spot” of

the magnet, optimizing image quality, which is not

possible for elbow, wrist, or hand images in a

conventional whole-body MR scanner.

Images obtained with a 1.0 T MR extremity scanner are

generally regarded as comparable to those obtained in

a standard 1.5 T whole-body scanner, although there

are limited objective studies at this time. A

comparative study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

showed excellent agreement between 1.5 T whole-body

MR and 1.0 T extremity MR in the scores for erosion,

synovitis, and bone marrow edema. Another study

compared accuracy and test-retest precision of

quantitative cartilage morphology in these two MR

systems and found no systematic bias between the

measurements of the cartilaginous surface of the

medial tibial plateau, the lateral tibial plateau, or the

central medial femoral condoyle. However, the study

revealed a statistically significant (P <>

of about 10% in cartilage volume (VC) and cartilage

thickness (ThCtAB) in the central lateral femoral

condyle.

Limitations

Although the large majority of patients can be scanned

with extremity MR, it is not suitable for all patients. The

bore size is 18 cm at its narrowest (Table 1), which

means that the scanner cannot be used for knee

imaging if the knee or distal thigh circumference is

greater than 22 1/4 inches (56.5 cm). Although casts

on wrists or arms are usually small enough to fit into

the magnet, a cast on the leg or ankle will not fit. In

addition, the patient must be able to flex his or her

ankle in order to pass the foot through the center of

F igure 1. The 1.0 T extremity MR scanner.

the bore. Therefore it is not possible to obtain images

of the knee if the patient has a cast on the ankle of the

same leg, and patients with limited ankle mobility may

find it difficult or impossible to insert their leg. Finally,

limited hip mobility can make it uncomfortable for a

patient to separate the legs sufficiently to place one leg

i n the magnet while the other rests on the floor.

The field of view of extremity MR can be no larger than

16 cm, which is smaller than a conventional scanner.

This means that the system truncates the visualization

of structures such as the quadriceps or Achilles tendon.

It is also not possible to view the entire hand or foot in

a single set of images. If the site of pain is localized to,

for example, the calcaneus region or the ball of the

foot, this is not a problem. However, the scanner is not

http://www.mghradrounds.org/clientuploads/may_2009/may_2009.pdf?PHPSESSID=532207e8d6c2f6cd9d54d62476893009


suitable for diagnosis of patients with extensive tumor

involvement because it is necessary to visualize the

whole foot in these patients.

Procedure

Patients sit or recline on an ergonomically designed

chair, positioned so that the appropriate limb is

comfortably resting inside the bore of the extremity MR

scanner. Patients find the extremity MR scanner less

intimidating than a conventional MR scan because the

experience is not claustrophobic and the scanner is

relatively quiet. This sense of comfort helps patients

remain still and reduces problems due to motion

artifact. Therefore, it could be excellent for pediatric

patients. Scan duration is 30-35 minutes.


Neuroimaging at 3T with Phoenix gallery

Magnetom World is a great source of information for MRI users they have always provided cutting edge techniques and resource for the community check them out.  Go to the  Phoenix  gallery for protocol help.  copy images right to your Siemens workstation.

Contrast Enhanced MR
Angiography (ce-MRA)
Superior gradient performance coupled with iPAT
parallel imaging allows ultrashort TR/TE exams
with high SNR. Siemens is a world leader in
gradient technology. This is of particular benefit
in angiographic applications in which the smallest
possible TE is desired to reduce spin dephasing
caused by field inhomogeneities and acceleration.
Routine Neuroimaging
The increased signal at 3 Tesla allows the
acquisition of ultra-fast neuro-anatomical images.
A 6 minute brain examination illustrates the point.
Contrast Enhanced MR
Angiography (ce-MRA)
Superior gradient performance coupled with iPAT
parallel imaging allows ultrashort TR/TE exams
with high SNR. Siemens is a world leader in
gradient technology. This is of particular benefit
in angiographic applications in which the smallest
possible TE is desired to reduce spin dephasing
caused by field inhomogeneities and acceleration.
MR Angiography
The routine 3D ToF MR angio sequence yields
excellent results with good visualization of secondary
and tertiary blood vessels. The increased T1 at 3T
also leads to improved background suppression in
time-of-flight techniques.
MRA of  Cerebral Arteries

Sunday, May 24, 2009

MRI guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT)


At the UMC Utrecht, The Netherlands, we have constructed a prototype MRI
accelerator. The prototype is amodified 6MVElekta (Crawley, UK) accelerator
next to a modified 1.5 T Philips Achieva (Best, The Netherlands) MRI system.
From the initial design onwards, modifications to both systems were aimed to
yield simultaneous and unhampered operation of the MRI and the accelerator.
Indeed, the simultaneous operation is shown by performing diagnostic quality
1.5 T MRI with the radiation beam on. No degradation of the performance of
either system was found. The integrated 1.5 T MRI system and radiotherapy
accelerator allowsimultaneous irradiation andMRimaging. The full diagnostic
imaging capacities of the MRI can be used; dedicated sequences for MRIguided
radiotherapy treatments will be developed. This proof of concept opens
the door towards a clinical prototype to start testing MRI-guided radiation
therapy (MRIgRT) in the clinic.


The integrated 1.5 T MRI system and radiotherapy accelerator allow simultaneous irradiation
and MR imaging. Both systems operate independently. The full diagnostic imaging capacities
of the Philips MRI can be used; dedicated sequences for guiding radiotherapy treatments will
be developed.
This proof of concept opens the door towards a clinical prototype to start testing MRIguided
radiation therapy (MRIgRT) in the clinic.

Acknowledgments
This research is supported by the Technology Foundation STW (applied science division of
NWO and the technology programme of the Ministry of Economic Affairs) and by the Dutch


Saturday, April 25, 2009



Thursday, April 23, 2009

U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) raided Siemens Healthcare offices

APRIL 22, 2009 | SPECIAL EDITION Cardiovascular Business | Portals | Subscribe | Contact Us Breaking News DoD agents raid Siemens Healthcare offices MALVERN, Pa.—The criminal investigation arm of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) raided Siemens Healthcare offices in Malvern, Pa., this morning to secure workstations, and seek out records related to several military contracts. The Defense Criminal Investigative Service appears to be focused on medical imaging contracts that the company has with the DoD. In early April, Siemens won a $267 million contract to supply radiology systems, subsystems and components on behalf of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. At approximately 3:00pm today, the federal agents were seen loading large white file boxes into a van, and the agents confirmed that the boxes contained seized records—both computerized and paper records. Lance Longwell, director of public relations at Siemens, said that the search focused on one floor on one building of Siemens’ Malvern campus, and the company asked its employees who work near the area subject to the search to leave for the remainder of the day and to return tomorrow for a regular workday. Special Agent-in-Charge Ed Bradley confirmed to the Philadelphia Inquirer that the search is part of an ongoing investigation but is not commenting on the nature of the probe. He said agents will remain on site “as long as it takes,” indicating that the all-day search will continue as documents are reviewed. Siemens said it “will continue to cooperate fully with the government’s investigation.” Further updates will be forthcoming. Cardiovascular Business CURRENT ISSUE • View Digital Edition • Search Articles • Subscribe • Advertise • Search Companies • Search Technologies • White Papers

http://epubs.democratprinting.com/publication/?i=13233&pre=1

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Autism and extraordinary ability

There is strong evidence for a link between genius and autism. In the first of three articles about the brain this week, we ask how that link works, and whether “neurotypicals” can benefit from the knowledge

Ronald Grant Archive

Sources and Resources
(Inclusion in this list does not indicate endorsement.)

Brain
A Guide to Brain Anatomy, Function and Symptoms
Guide to Brain Anatomy, Function and Symptoms: The Cerebellum And The Brain Stem
Anatomy of the Brain
Brain Function: Language
Brain Functions and Map
Broca/Wernicke image
Broca’s Area, Wernicke’s Area, And Other Language Processing Areas In The Brain (1)
Broca’s Area, Wernicke’s Area, And Other Language Processing Areas In The Brain (2)
Functional Divisions of the Cerebral Cortex
Glossary of Brain Regions
Glossary of Neurology Terms
Hypothalamus
Limbic System
What is the Cerebellum?

Autism
Autism and the Cerebellum: A Neurophysiological Basis for Intervention
Autism Fact Sheet (NINDS)
Autism Fact Sheet (Child Development Institute)
Autism For Kids
Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pervasive Developmental Disorders)(NIMH)
Autistic Brain Has Difficulty Coordinating
“A growing number of scientists believe autism may be caused by a lack of coordination in the brain.
‘Some people think that autism is a disruption of social function,’ says Marcel Just of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. ‘But I think it’s much more widespread. It’s a disruption of many kinds of behaviors that require good cortical coordination.’”
Clue to autism revealed
“Researchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute have found that the areas of the brain responsible for emotion and memory are abnormally large in boys with autism.”
Current Research on Autism (Child Development Institute) 

Autism is one of five pervasive developmental disorders of the brain causing problems in the areas of social interaction, communication, behavior and oftentimes moderate mental retardation. Autism appears in one of every 150 births and has a growth rate of 10 to 17 percent each year.

Individuals with autism are said to process incoming information differently than others, focusing primarily on the details of an interaction or environment. Studies show a series of abnormalities taking place in the autistic brain. 
Autism can occur within a broad functional spectrum, with low functioning abilities on one side and high functioning autistic abilities on the other. Individuals within the higher functioning range have average to above-average intelligence and can function within a normal lifestyle.

THAT genius is unusual goes without saying. But is it so unusual that it requires the brains of those that possess it to be unusual in others ways, too? A link between artistic genius on the one hand and schizophrenia and manic-depression on the other, is widely debated. However another link, between savant syndrome and autism, is well established. It is, for example, the subject of films such as “Rain Man”, illustrated above.

A study published this week by Patricia Howlin of King’s College, London, reinforces this point. It suggests that as many as 30% of autistic people have some sort of savant-like capability in areas such as calculation or music. Moreover, it is widely acknowledged that some of the symptoms associated with autism, including poor communication skills and an obsession with detail, are also exhibited by many creative types, particularly in the fields of science, engineering, music, drawing and painting. Indeed, there is now a cottage industry in re-interpreting the lives of geniuses in the context of suggestions that they might belong, or have belonged, on the “autistic spectrum”, as the range of syndromes that include autistic symptoms is now dubbed.

So what is the link? And can an understanding of it be used to release flashes of genius in those whose brains are, in the delightfully condescending term used by researchers in the area, “neurotypical”? Those were the questions addressed by papers (one of them Dr Howlin’s) published this week in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. The society, Britain’s premier scientific club and the oldest scientific body in the world, produces such transactions from time to time, to allow investigators in particular fields to chew over the state of the art. The latest edition is the outcome of a conference held jointly with the British Academy (a similar, though younger, organisation for the humanities and social sciences) last September.

A spectrum of belief

A standard diagnosis of autism requires three things to be present in an individual. Two of these three, impairments in social interaction and in communication with other people, are the results of autists lacking empathy or, in technical jargon, a “theory of mind”. In other words they cannot, as even fairly young neurotypicals can, put themselves in the position of another being and ask themselves what that other is thinking. The third criterion, however, is that a person has what are known as restrictive and repetitive behaviours and interests, or RRBI, in the jargon.

Until recently, the feeling among many researchers was that the first two features were crucial to someone becoming a savant. The idea was that mental resources which would have been used for interaction and communication could be redeployed to develop expertise in some arbitrary task. Now, though, that consensus is shifting. Several of the volume’s authors argue that it is the third feature, RRBI, that permits people to become savants.

Francesca Happé of King’s College, London, is one of them. As she observes, obsessional interests and repetitive behaviours would allow someone to practice, albeit inadvertently, whichever skill they were obsessed by. Malcolm Gladwell, in a book called “Outliers” which collated research done on outstanding people, suggested that anyone could become an expert in anything by practising for 10,000 hours. It would not be hard for an autistic individual to clock up that level of practice for the sort of skills, such as mathematical puzzles, that many neurotypicals would rapidly give up on.

Many, but not all. Dr Happé has drawn on a study of almost 13,000 individual twins to show that childhood talent in fields such as music and art is often associated with RRBIs, even in those who are not diagnosed as classically autistic. She speculates that the abilities of savants in areas that neurotypicals tend to find pointless or boring may result from an ability to see differences where a neurotypical would see only similarities. As she puts it, “the child with autism who would happily spend hours spinning coins, or watching drops of water fall from his fingers, might be considered a connoisseur, seeing minute differences between events that others regard as pure repetition.”

Simon Baron-Cohen, a doyen of the field who works at Cambridge University, draws similar conclusions. He suggests the secret of becoming a savant is “hyper-systematising and hyper-attention to detail”. But he adds sensory hypersensitivity to the list. His team have shown one example of this using what is known as the Freiburg visual acuity and contrast test, which asks people to identify the gap in a letter “c” presented in four different orientations. Those on the autistic spectrum do significantly better at this than do neurotypicals. That might help explain Dr Happé’s observations about coins and raindrops.

Insight, too, is given by autists themselves. Temple Grandin is a professor of animal science at Colorado State University. She also writes about her experience of being autistic. As she describes in the volume, one of the differences she perceives between her experience and that of most neurotypicals is that she thinks in images. She says her mind is like an internet search engine that searches for photographs. To form concepts, she sorts these pictures into categories. She does not, however, claim that all autistic people think like this. To the contrary, she describes two other sorts: pattern thinkers who excel at maths and music, and verbal specialists who are good at talking and writing, but lack visual skills. The latter might not qualify as autistic under a traditional diagnosis, but slip into the broader autistic spectrum.

The question of how the autistic brain differs physically from that of neurotypicals was addressed by Manuel Casanova of the University of Louisville, in Kentucky. Dr Casanova has spent many years dissecting both. His conclusion is that the main difference is in the structure of the small columns of nerve cells that are packed together to form the cerebral cortex. The cortical columns of those on the autistic spectrum are narrower than those of neurotypicals, and their cells are organised differently.

The upshot of these differences is that the columns in an autistic brain seem to be more connected than normal with their close neighbours, and less connected with their distant ones. Though it is an interpretative stretch, that pattern of connection might reduce a person’s ability to generalise (since disparate data are less easily integrated) and increase his ability to concentrate (by drawing together similar inputs).

Rain and sunshine

Given such anatomical differences, then, what hope is there for the neurotypical who would like to be a savant? Some, possibly. There are examples of people suddenly developing extraordinary skills in painting and music in adult life as a result of brain damage caused by accidents or strokes. That, perhaps, is too high a price to pay. But Allan Snyder of the University of Sydney has been able to induce what looks like a temporary version of this phenomenon using magnetism.

Dr Snyder argues that savant skills are latent in everyone, but that access to them is inhibited in non-savants by other neurological processes. He is able to remove this inhibition using a technique called repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

Applying a magnetic field to part of the brain disrupts the electrical activity of the nerve cells for a few seconds. Applying such a field repeatedly can have effects that last for an hour or so. The technique has been approved for the treatment of depression, and is being tested against several other conditions, including Parkinson’s disease and migraines. Dr Snyder, however, has found that stimulating an area called the left anterior temporal lobe improves people’s ability to draw things like animals and faces from memory. It helps them, too, with other tasks savants do famously well—proofreading, for example, and estimating the number of objects in a large group, such as a pile of match sticks. It also reduces “false” memories (savants tend to remember things literally, rather than constructing a mnemonic narrative and remembering that).

There are, however, examples of people who seem very neurotypical indeed achieving savant-like skills through sheer diligence. Probably the most famous is that of London taxi drivers, who must master the Knowledge—ie, the location of 25,000 streets, and the quickest ways between them—to qualify for a licence.

The expert here is Eleanor Maguire of University College, London, who famously showed a few years ago that the shape of the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in long-term learning, changes in London cabbies. Dr Maguire and her team have now turned their attention to how cabbies learn the Knowledge.

The prodigious geographical knowledge of the average cabbie is, indeed, savant-like. But Dr Maguire recently found that it comes at a cost. Cabbies, on average, are worse than random control subjects and—horror—also worse than bus drivers, at memory tests such as word-pairing. Surprisingly, that is also true of their general spatial memory. Nothing comes for nothing, it seems, and genius has its price.

Savant syndrome, then, is a case where the politically correct euphemism “differently abled” has real meaning. The conclusion that should be drawn, perhaps, is not that neurotypicals should attempt to ape savants, but that savants—even those who are not geniuses—should be welcomed for what they are, and found a more honoured place in society.

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

words of wisdom

A man may learn wisdom even from a foe. - Aristophanes

Kavala Greece

The MRI LIE Detector Who is safe? NO LIE - CEPHOS


they sure look guilty

So, here’s the question , should politicians be subjected to the MRI lie detector? It has started to make some noise in the MRI community. Should we be using FMRI for its lie detector ability?

Can an fMRI like this one detect lies? [Credit: Washington Irvine, Wikimedia Commons]

For 5,000 dollars, a computer will scan your brain several times while asking you a series of banal yes or no questions: Do you live in Texas? Is it 2009? It will also ask you one important question, such as: Did you burn down the shop? Or, have you cheated on your spouse? Shortly thereafter, it will spit out two numbers. And the creators of the test insist that those two numbers will determine if, when you answered the serious question, you were lying.

This method of lie detection, which relies on brain scans rather than a racing heart, still hasn’t gained widespread support among mainstream neuroscientists or the legal community. But two companies, Cephos Corporation in Tyngsboro, Massachusetts, and No Lie MRI in San Diego,California, are already marketing it to clients, at a time when many experts worry about the technique’s accuracy in detecting real-life lies, as opposed to the fibs conjured up by study volunteers in experiments. And even if the test is reliable, experts question whether the results of this sort of mind reading should be admissible in court.

 

 

Joe Larson, one of the inventors of the polygraph machine demonstrates in the 1930s. The validity of the polygraph has come increasingly into question over past decades.

 

 

But many neuroscientists and legal scholars say the evidence isn’t ready for the courtroom. Judy Illes, a neuroethicist at the University of British Columbiain Vancouver, calls the companies “premature” and says “I don’t think we have the scientific evidence yet to be selling fMRI for the kind of applications they are supporting. . . . It’s a tall order to be able to sell results.”

Cephos’ test relies on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a technology that measures changes in blood flow to different areas of the brain over time. Working neurons require more oxygen and thus more blood, just as working muscles do, so by tracking blood flow, fMRI shows which areas of the brain are most active at any particular moment.

Many fMRI studies have concluded that a few key areas of the brain are more active during deception than truth-telling. These include the anterior cingulate cortex, which is involved in attention and monitoring processes, and the left dorsolateral and right anterior prefrontal cortices, areas of executive function involved in working memory and behavioral control.

If prosecutors try to get the results of fMRI lie detection tests admitted into court, they can expect a challenge based on the Constitution’s ban on self-incriminating testimony, according to Kenneth Foster, a bioengineer who is also associated with the University of Pennsylvania’s neuroethics program.

“Legally, is having a brain scan similar to a urine sample or similar to testifying?” Foster asks. If it’s considered testimony, then defendants could challenge it by citing their Fifth Amendment rights. “This kind of dilemma has to be solved soon because it’ll make a big difference in the way courts see the admissibility of this evidence.”

 

Sunday, February 22, 2009

MRI suite is following LEED Platinum standards with new IMRI suite

MRI suite is following LEED Platinum standards with new IMRI suite

Posted by turbospinecho on February 22, 2009

Burt-Watts Constructs LEED-Certified MRI Suite

Austin-based Burt-Watts Industries, Inc. will provide general contracting and construction management services for the expansion of a new $10.8 million dollar intra-operative MRI suite at Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas.

The IMRISneuro is a fully integrated operating room that includes a unique, movable MRI machine that allows surgeons to safely image patients in the operating room during brain surgery.

Dell Children’s Medical Center’s 6,000-sq-ft suite, scheduled to open this summer, is one of less than 20 medical facilities in the world to have the IMRISneuro. The suite, to be located 20 ft below ground-level, will have copper shielding. A room will be also specifically designed to house the IMRISneuro when not in use.

The new MRI suite is following LEED Platinum standards. Dell Children’s is the first hospital in the world to receive the designation.

Austin, Texas - (January 8, 2008) Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas, a member of the Seton Family of Hospitals, has become the first hospital in the world to receive the LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) Platinum designation, given by the U.S. Green Building Council.

“Even before the first plans were drawn up, we set our sights on creating a world-class children’s hospital, and becoming the first LEED Platinum hospital in the world was definitely part of that,” said Robert Bonar, president and CEO, Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas. “Our motivation to pursue LEED Platinum was not just environmental. Being a ‘green’ hospital has a profound, measureable effect on healing. What’s good for the environment and good for our Mueller neighbors is also good for our patients.”

Dell Children’s, which occupies nearly one-half million square feet on 32 acres that were once part of Austin’s old Mueller Airport, opened in June 2007. Its environmentally-sensitive design not only conserves water and electricity, but positively impacts the hospital’s clinical environment by improving air quality, making natural sunlight more readily available, and reducing a wide range of pollutants.

Inside the facility, sunlight reaches 80 percent of the available space. Outside, sustainable and indigenous building materials were used throughout the façade. A 4.3 megawatt natural gas-fired power plant produces 100 percent of the hospital’s electricity, heating and cooling.

Dell Children’s routinely plays host to visiting clinical, environmental and architectural experts from around the world, and features six interior healing gardens, each representing a distinct ecosystem within Dell Children’s 46-county service area.

In order to achieve LEED certification, buildings are rated in five key areas: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. Listed below are some of the accomplishments in each LEED category:read more
here

virtual tour

Huntington’s Chorea

Please Help support this Cause

The disease was Huntington’s Chorea, which is an inherited, degenerative disorder of the Central Nervous System, caused by a dominant gene. This means that everyone who inherits the gene from one of his/her parents WILL develop the disease, and the likelihood of doing so is therefore 50%.

Huntington’s Chorea is a particularly devastating disease because symptoms normally do not occur until after the age of 35, but can onset later (the earlier the onset, the more severe the disease tends to be). It is principally a movement disorder, with the first observable symptoms manifesting themselves as ‘clumsiness’, but as the disease progresses the movements become uncontrollable. These movements appear to be very bizarre and include odd bodily postures. Other symptoms are also apparent including forgetfulness and irritability or withdrawing (in the early stages) progressing to dementia with severe memory loss and lack of reasoning.

Patients suffering from Huntington’s Chorea show degenerative changes in the basal ganglia structures, which ultimately result in a severely shrunken brain and enlarged ventricles. The caudate and putamen brain structures are particularly affected as they shrink up to half their normal size.

The symptoms of the disease are caused by a significant reduction (volume and activity) of two principal neurotransmitters (naturally occurring chemicals in the brain) - namely Acetylcholine and GABA, in turn affecting the activity of the neurotransmitter Dopamine, which becomes hyperactive. Huntington’s Chorea is therefore the ‘flip side of the coin’ to another movement disorder - Parkinson’s Disease where there is dopamine under activity.

Huntington’s Chorea is principally characterized by hyperkinesias - abnormal, purposeless, involuntary motor movements that can occur spontaneously or only when the patient is trying to do something. These movements may be repetitive or non-repetitive.

Drug therapies can ease the symptoms of the disease (including the use of dopamine antagonists or neuroleptics) but there may be severe side effects with these drugs. Unfortunately, there is no cure for Huntington’s Chorea. However, new techniques involving neural grafting (implanting healthy fetal brain cells into the damaged areas) may offer hope for sufferers in the near future.

Here is a new link for Huntington's full of information for you....

http://www.medicinenet.com/huntington_disease/article.htm

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Iphone and MRI its here ! as seen on television


AMAZON search for Iphone

GOOGLE search for iphones



OsiriX , the wonderful open-source Mac image viewer, just announced the availability of an iPhone version.



Like a lot of imaging software, OsiriX lets one look at X-rays, ultrasounds, CT and MR images. Besides merely viewing, it also lets one reconstruct 3D images and rotate them around.

Unlike most imaging software, OsiriX is written by radiologists who also happen to be clever programmers. Also unlike most imaging software, OsiriX doesn't require a second mortgage. The full Mac-based version is free, and the iPhone app is $20.

Why should a non-physician care about Osirix? Because this little app will let you carry around a library of your own personal medical images. Even in my prior life as an internist, I always urged patients to keep their own copy of their more important images. The OsiriX app finally makes this easy and portable.

In the radiology biz, we call prior imaging exams "old films", and they can be staggeringly useful to a patient and their physicians. One of my patients once avoided having a risky lung biopsy simply because he happened to have an old film at home as a curiosity. This old film showed us pretty convincingly that the potential lung cancer we saw on his new film was actually a benign granuloma, and was unchanged over the intervening decades.

How do you get copies of your own images? Ask your local radiology department to burn you a CD in DICOM format. Most departments will also include free image-viewing software on the disk. If you're a Mac owner, download a copy of OsiriX, which will read virtually all of these disks, even if written by PC's.

If you're a geeky radiologist, you're probably already playing with the new app. If you're a non-geek, ask your teenager or local radiologist to put it on your phone for you.(source)






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